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10 Dec, 2018

KASI TO KASI, ALL HOODS HAVE NICKNAMES- WHAT’S THE NAME OF YOURS?

Township image SA9.co.za
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KASI lama kasi can never be a hood’s nickname. Everyone rightfully punts their neighbourhood as the coolest black area. But each township in South Africa has a nickname, approved by its people, which sometimes ties to the history of the place.

I was chilling with a fella this past weekend who told me he was from Vutha. You know when you’ve heard something before, but don’t know exactly know what it is. I went blank and asked where that is. “It’s Daveyton,” he said.

“Because it was the first township in Gauteng to get electricity,” he said. I thought he was bullshitting me, really. I’ve met many people who’ll talk-up their hoods, to a point of which they get frustratingly economical with the truth. But after doing some research, I found that, what he said is true.

Established in 1952, after about 151,656 people were moved from Benoni, to what we know today as Vutha or Etwatwa. It was indeed, the first black area to access ugesi.

The president of the Greater Alexandra Chamber of Commerce (Galxcoc), Mpho Motsumi last year bemoaned to the media, while taking them around the construction site of the R500-million Alex Mall in Tsutsumani Village. What got the business man cranky, was that people still call Alex, Gomorrah- ‘Sodom and Gomorrah’ a biblical reference of place linked to hell because of the prevalence of debauchery in the area.  Rappers like Flabba popularised the name in recent times, but it’s been a name associated with the township for decades now. There was a time when Alex had a high crime rate, a coupled with the lawless gangsterism that was in the area-despite political movements happening there.

Some nicknames aren’t linked to the township’s past, but are just tweaked so to make the place a tad bit cooler. I’m not certain whether it was a collective agreement but, shortening hood names seems to be the winning formula in most parts of Pretoria. For Mamelodi there’s Mams, Soshanguve which is situated on the north is commonly known as Sosha, even to us who don’t call it home. While the ‘Ga’ in Ga-Rankuwa seems a waste of two precious seconds, so Rankuwa is the more efficient one for residents.

Sowetans have also opted for something similar. Calling the south western townships Sotra. While the number of townships within that area, have nicknames of their own. Guguletu in Cape Town also just switched the swag and just called it, Gugs.

In KwaZulu-Natal, KwaMashu is nicknamed Es’nqawunqawini while Clermont is known as Es’komplazi. Ekurhuleni Township Tsakane, which is a Tsonga word for happiness and joy, is nicknamed Mashona.

If Tembisa was a gang, those thugs would tattoo 1632 on their bodies. What is it? Tembisa’s postal code my friend. Insipid as a postal code is, the youth in Tembisa, particularly those in the Hip Hop community, popularised it in the mid-90s. Tembisa’s older generation and also those who aren’t in the Hip Hop community,still prefer to call it Mambisa. Other hoods that have gone with the number are Kagiso with 1754, Thokoza 1421 or Vosloorus’s 1425. I’ve found that this is a trend, also adopted by Hip Hop heads in other hoods. A random person doesn’t say they are from 1563, they simply say they are from KwaThema, or just Thema.

The common thread in all these townships, sadly is that they were formed after black people were forcefully removed from some areas, to be crammed in one place right near their modern day fields of slavery. But black people have taken what was meant to trap and prison them, and found the beauty in it.

Bonginkosi Ntiwane

Bonginkosi Ntiwane is a storyteller born in 1991 and bred in Tembisa, on the east side of Gauteng. He graduated from Arts and Media institution City Varsity in 2012 in Journalism. While job hunting in 2013, he volunteered at the Urban Brew Studios working as an assistant (basically helping with whatever that was required in the studio or the office). His stay there wasn’t long because he received a call for another volunteering gig, but this one was at Times Media Group (TMG, Now Tiso Blackstar) working for The Times newspaper. He jumped at the opportunity as he was very keen on print journalism.


4 comments

  • Don

    09/13/2018 at 3:10 PM

    “But black people have taken what was meant to trap and prison them, and found the beauty in it.” I like the ending. Salute Bongs.

    Reply

  • Duma

    10/17/2018 at 3:54 PM

    Mina I’m from Spyland. . .wonder if anybody can figure out where that is?

    Reply

  • Duma

    10/17/2018 at 3:54 PM

    Mina I’m from Spyland. . .wonder if anybody can figure out where that is?

    Reply

    • Bonginkosi Ntiwane

      10/18/2018 at 4:02 PM

      That’s Katlegong, isn’t it?

      Reply

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