Entertainment

gettyimages-2298668-1024x1024.jpg

3min530

BEFORE Google was in the palm of our hands, in the form of our smartphones, many a time arguments took place between friends and family about who the real Glen Lewis is.

The irony is that, neither of the two men were born with that name. Lewis Mposteng Tshinaba, the South African radio jock took up the ‘Glen Lewis’ nickname long before most South African were introduced to the Don’t You Forget singer, Glennon Ricketts Jr. who is better known as Glenn Lewis.

DJ GLEN LEWIS. Photo by Metro FM

It’s humorously intriguing where the DJ derived the ‘Glen’ in his name from and also puzzling what inspired the ‘Lewis’ in the Neo-Soul singer’s stage name.  Their music genres are far apart from each other than Julius Malema and Pravin Gordhan, but like two fellas unknown to each other falling for the same girl, the artists connected to the same moniker.

Glenn Lewis debut album cover, World Outside My Window. Glenn Lewis

But there’s a difference in the spelling of their names. The club DJ’s name is simply written Glen Lewis, while the Canadian artist has an extra ‘n’ to his first name.

The latter is coming down to Mzansi with other hasbeens; 90s R&B quartet Blackstreet and Melanie Fiona, for the second annual SoulFest which will take place at the Joburg’s Ticketpro Dome, on Women’s Day in August.

The event is hosted by the same company that brought SWV, Dru Hill and TLC last year in their inaugural SoulFest. “Last year was a great success. The idea is to create one magical night of music with young and old singing along to every song,” said Glen Netshipise of Glen21 Entertainment, in a statement.


Thato Mahlangu06/03/2019
Freedom-2019_190505_084_copyright-Sanmari-Marais-1280x854.jpg

5min440

Filled with so many emotions, I wonder how Aubrey Sekhabi and Kabelo “Bonafide Billi” Togoe managed to actually write the whole script of the musical. Freedom, which was inspired by the efforts of brave young people who took their issues to the streets when university vice-chancellors flatly ignored their pleas of free education.

Students fought hard (with some being arrested and others succumbing to wounds which were inflicted by the police and community members) to get what is now a free education, which others still argue there is nothing free about it as taxpayers will have to forge some cents if not more to pay for billions of fees in the next coming years.

The musical by Sekhabi which has been running at the SA State Theatre summaries the dramatic events which led to the then president of the republic, Jacob Zuma, announcing this free education.

Phindile Ndlovu, who is one of the main characters lived to tell the tale of how she was raped by her musician boyfriend, Bonafide- the music star’s life was taken by a member of the SA Police Service. His story reminds me that of Katlego Monareng from the Tshwane University of Technology whose life, like that of Bonafide’s, was cut short by a trigger-happy policeman. Bonafide’s character was portrayed by rapper PdotO.

There are many stories that will never be told on mainstream media including those of young men who sell their bodies to men and women just to be able to pay for an apartment.

But I must say, I appreciate both Sekhabi and Togoe’s hunger to tell those stories so authentically and so honestly. One has to salute the Freedom team for having chosen to tell the stories of these young people who were failed by the government and the higher education department’s minister Blade Nzimande (who features in the musical in the form of the talented opera singer Otto Maidi).

Students fighting for theirs.Photo by Sanmari Marais

So many issues are explored in the musical including femicide, which has claimed the lives of many women. Young women like Karabo Mokoena and model Reeva Steenkamp, who like many women whose bodies lay cold in cemeteries and morgues, were killed by their partners.

I pray and hope that this musical, which has now been adapted into a book, will be bought by some TV station and turned into a film or TV series for it to be seen by many, especially our ‘leaders’ who were elected into power to protect and serve the people. We both know that some people don’t do the theatre like me and you.

Freedom is an award winning musical, with brilliant choreography done by award winning choreographer, director and actor Mduduzi Nhlapo; the story was well-researched with a stellar cast.


images-2-1.jpg

6min540

IT’s like being soul-crushingly stood-up last minute by the one you’ve been pursuing for a long while, and then jiki-jki you’re cringingly excited by a random call or text from your perpetrator, not long after being let down.

So that was it; how I felt after the announcement of this year’s AfroPunk Joburg line-up. A friend who had the flyer on his WhatsApp status was going crazy over GoldLink finally coming down south for a performance. SMH. After a closer look, I also saw the names of Solange Piaget Knowles and Micah Davis. SMFH.

The three of them; Solange, GoldLink and Masego abandoned their South African fans and left them hanging in the past few years. It was in the afternoon of December 2017 , Central African Time, when Beyoncé’s baby sister dropped the bombshell on Insta, stating health reasons for cancelling her performance at AfroPunk’s inaugural African event. “…however it is important to me for the people in South Africa, a place that has tremendous meaning to me and that has given me SO SO MUCH, to know why I won’t be performing at Afropunk this NYE. The past five months I have been quietly treating, and working through an Autonomic Disorder,” she wrote on social media.

AP organisers vehemently promised to have the dope-ass creative the following year, mara nex in twenty18. A part of me is like “Tsek!” after I saw her name on this year’s flyer while another leans on the proverb “better late than never”.

While Solange was specific about her condition, rap singer GoldLink just said he had a health issue, in a statement released by Rocking The Daises organisers. “Due to unforeseen personal health reasons, GoldLink will not be performing at this year’s Rocking The Daises and In the City festivals in Cape Town and Johannesburg. GoldLink is extremely disappointed that he won’t be playing to his South African fans this weekend but promises to return soon.” He is returning soon, sooner than Solange was promised to us.

AfroPunk2019 lineup
AfroPunk2019 lineup

Jamaican-born musician Masego had fans dissatisfied last year, when he was booked to headline the Flying Fish Flavour Odyssey together with rapper J.I.D but cancelled due to “unforeseen circumstances”. The Navajo singer was stranded at an airport, in another continent just a day before his performance. Like a decent human being, he apologised and made the promise to return. And he kept it. Masego performed earlier this month to throngs of his fans. I’m just not sure whether South Africans want to see more of the lanky dude,so soon.

AP better have a back-up plan should all three decide to take a rain check-the three have left scars on their Mzansi fans which will take some time to heal. “I have very hectic trust issues. This line-up is triggering me. The ghosts of all the money I threw away at Flying Fish, Rocking The Daisies and AfroPunk2018 is screaming at me right now,” said ManchaM on twitter.

This year’s line-up was released earlier than AP usually publishes their list of performers. It’s kinda too good to be true. Only time will tell if the said artists will perform at this year’s AP.


Thato Mahlangu05/21/2019
59eb73ea-d77c-41b9-8d0f-53de81fec466-1280x851.jpg

6min360

Mbuso Khoza plans to take theatergoers on a trip to Africa through music this week at the Joburg Theatre.

The celebrated musician whose love for culture and heritage can be heard in some of his hits songs including the recently released track Thando which he collaborates with the talented deejay, film and music producer Black Coffee.

Khoza will be joined on the Mandela stage by his band the Afrikan Heritage Ensemble, where the team will, in music demonstrate what Africa Day is. Africa, a rich continent with a painful and dark history has enjoyed little freedom, with much of existence was spent in freeing itself from foreign exploitation and domination.  Many countries will take part in celebrating what is today known as Africa Day, which is really a celebration of what Africa and Africans have achieved in these past decades after many years of colonel rule.

In a statement, the versatile Khoza said that art is the most influential channel to make the intangible heritage felt. He said he uses it to also pursue the revival of Afrikan unity which he said is very important to use it without dividing our people.

“We continue to draw inspiration from our roots as we redefine our identity using the body of work bequeathed to us by our forebears in the arts, culture and intellectual disciplines. I believe that as an artist, my job is to mirror the views and feelings of my people – especially around the painful issue of Xenophobia. Africa Month serves as a tool to spread the message of patriotism and acceptance of one another as brothers and sisters, and with the universal language of music we want to contribute towards breaking these chains that bind us as brothers,” says Khoza.

Mbuso Khoza clad in African attire. Photo supplied

According to the Joburg Theatre, this performance follows three consecutive sold-out performances in January 2019 where Khoza and the Afrikan Heritage Ensemble staged the first Isandlwana Lecture which was described as a first of its kind in the country.

Khoza together with his four-piece band will mesmerize those attending with a two-part performance. Patrons will enjoy 16 songs chosen from the band’s previous projects. “With the four-piece band, we shall present a selection of Africa-centric music consisting of both original compositions as well as other seminal works by other African giants including Salif Keita and Richard Bona,” says Khoza.

The Afrikan Heritage Ensemble. Photo supplied

Khoza and The Afrikan Heritage Ensemble will give audiences an enchanting performance when they interpret Amahubo, the music from 17th century Southern Africa region, concretising this marriage of past and present with the view into the future.

The ensemble will also explore the relationship between Amahubo and the songs of struggle.

The Afrikan Heritage Ensemble has recorded two full albums of Amahubo with the latter featuring a decorated jazz pianist from Amsterdam, Netherlands Mike del Ferro.

“Those lucky enough to secure the tickets for the Joburg Theatre shows will be mesmerized by the vitality, originality and the stimulating qualities of this long-abandoned art-form whose relevance remains uncontested centuries later,” read the theatre’s statement.1


city-girls-cardi-b-twerk-music-video.png

7min1391

I’d like to think I’m writing this after seeing the best video category from this year’s South African Music Awards nomination’s list.But it was rather going through a friend’s external hard drive and coming across 2PAC’s How Do You Want It with the brothers K-Ci & JoJo.

It was the triple ‘X’ in the title of the video that got my attention. Bar the excitement my body couldn’t hide from seeing erotic scenes, I actually sat there pondering for what seemed like an eternity, on the paucity of X-rated versions of music videos.

I grew up in a time where tracks had two versions of the video, the dirty one and the clean version for prime time television. Artists still make clean versions of their songs for radio and will have the explicit joints on their albums. Dirty doesn’t only pertain to women gyrating their rears in front of the camera; it is what viewers deem offensive. Be it nudity, unpleasant language or the depiction of violence in a music video-and more.

Rapper Jay-Z found himself in some trouble for his 99 Problems video. Shot in Brooklyn, New York the video depicts life for niggers in the hood and the city. In the last scene, a defenceless Jigga is shot at multiple times on a sidewalk. It was viewed as something done in bad taste. So bad, that MTV would only broadcast the video with an introduction from Jay-Z explaining that it was a metaphorical death, not a real one.  I know right, my eyes rolled too.

Black Entertainment Television (BET) designated their late hours to these explicit music videos, in a programme called BET Uncut. Uncut aired from 2001 till 2006, playing mostly Hip Hop videos with gross sexual imagery that had many teenagers risk getting an ass-whipping just to watch their favourite artists, next to some of the finest booty you’ll ever see.

A slew of explicit Hip Hop videos aired in those five years but nothing was raunchier than Nelly’s Tip Drill which saw dudes in throwback jerseys, du-rags and Air Forces at a house party that probably had three naked women for each fella in the video. I remember first seeing the video on a friend’s computer while in high school, with a grin on my face marvelling at why we never have such house parties when we decide to bunk school.

BET Uncut came to an end after many complaints about the show being distasteful and constituting soft porn. Rightfully so, it was.

In South Africa, artists play it safe. If they create videos which are polarizing, it’s usually for their “strong” tone on politics or social issues.

Last year a complaint came to the Broadcasting Complaints Commission South Africa (BCCSA) about Kwesta’s Spirit music video. The viewer’s grievance was about the slaughtering of chicken in some of the scenes. The rapper was also accused of trying to score political points by burning the old South African flag in the video.

In 2014 The Zimbabwean government under Robert Mugabe’s rule, turned away South African band Freshly Ground as soon as they landed at the Harare International airport , with no reason as to why. But in 2010, the collective released Chicken to Change, mocking Mugabe’s stubborn grip to power since the country gained independence in 1980. Guess Uncle Bob couldn’t let them get away with what they did four years prior.

South Africa has banned more ads and artwork than it has music videos.

Music and videos that the average viewer might find offence, are not officially banned but ghosted. You wouldn’t find Die Antwoord’s videos on MTVBase, simply because a censored version would usurp the video of its punch.

The internet has given directors and artists the liberty in their video-making, to create without fear of being ostracized by mainstream media for their authenticity.

The creative freedom is refreshing,especially because for so long,men have dictated what images of women are shown. Now women can decide how they want to be seen, Beyoncé is a fine case in point.



About us

We’ll Not Change The World Ourselves. But We’ll Spark The Minds That Do.
Read More

CONTACT US




Newsletter





Will be used in accordance with our Privacy Policy