Blog

Bring to the table win-win survival strategies to ensure proactive domination. At the end of the day, going forward, a new normal that has evolved from generation.
IMG-20200918-WA0007.jpg
7min1540

IT’S no surprise that the West considered Dr. Sebi a health fraud because he stood firm against the pharmaceutical industry, but it’s unsettling to see Africans reject the natural way of healing. But four years after Sebi’s passing, and being caught in a certain pandemic Noni Godole is bringing about a change in the relationship abo darkie have with healthy eating.

“I feel like our Creator/ Umvelinqange would move the earth just to get our attention, we are by birth attached to The Mother and She will do anything to get us to connect to our true selves. Somehow this has brought [us] closer to home than anything. We got to cook more, get to taste ginger, trust nature much deeper than we ever have. I was raised with umhlonyane, I still give it to my kids and I have it in the garden. For the first [time] our people actually believed in nature and trusted nature to heal them,” says Godole.

Noni doing her thang. Photo supplied
Noni doing her thang. Photo supplied

Godole who is a chef and an untiring advocate for herbal healing hosts the Indigenous Food and Herb Expo this Heritage day at Betty’s BnB in Sharpville, in the Vaal. “I know our people are the hardest hit, we’re always the hardest hit where identity is concerned, we are given a day to celebrate who we are and a piece of our truth is slowly being wiped away by the ever evolving world and of course convenience with that comes self-destruction and we tear pieces of our DNA while at it.” Godole tells me.

Noni's dish. Photo by Native Rebles
Noni’s dish. Photo by Native Rebles

“This Expo hopes to reclaim our heritage and start eating right again, reclaim our relationship with the soil, with nature. The food we are consuming and claimed to be our own is a lie and it’s here to move us even further from our truth.”

The importance of this being hosted in the township should not be downplayed because too many times these expos- be it cannabis, wine or sex- are hosted in the burbs by Caucasians. It also dispels the notion that abantu can’t organise themselves. Godole says the Expo will go from hood to hood, to preach the gospel of eating healthy. They plan to hit the Ekurhuleni after this.

Eating healthy seems daunting, not only for the taste buds but also the pocket. It’s a stigma attached to eating well, that it’s expensive.  “That healthy eating is expensive and it’s for white people. I can’t deal!!!” exclaims Godole.

Mama in tha kitchen with her greens. Photo supplied
Mama in tha kitchen with her greens. Photo supplied

“Social conditioning is what’s killing us, we are told good food is expensive, and for you to be healthy you must spend. How much is a seedling, how much is one seed? A veg combo compared to a meat combo? By choosing veggies or growing them yourself over buying meat every day, meat which is killing you while you at it. We’ve been wrongly programmed, go to the Yeoville market and see the excuses we create for convenience.”

The Expo will also include performances and presentations by Noni and her guests. “It’s time we became ourselves, it’s time we lived our truth openly because that is what will save us. We have natural born, gifted healers among us and it’s like having a team of super heroes that were chosen to carry and spread light. On this day we will be sharing the knowledge that we were trusted with by what and who we are, we are suggesting much friendlier ways to live and save our world.”

Something Fishy. Photo supplied
Something Fishy. Photo supplied
2B8A1721-1280x853.jpg
8min1490

“HELLO LIEFIES” is probably not the first thing you’d expect to spew from a dark-skinned fella rocking a wifebeater, chino pants with feet bare, in the backyard over Drake’s Pound Cake beat. But I guess that’s what makes Jabulani Majola- a Zulu man based in Cape Town, who has a slight lisp and enjoys his coffee- so unique.

“The word “liefies” is Afrikaans for lovers. It’s a word I started using a lot when greeting friends in the latter part of 2019 and it just stuck with me so I just started using it with everyone” Majola tells me. The young man from Greytown in KwaZulu-Natal, is one of the many emcee who stood-out during Stogie T’s refreshing Freestyle Fridays.

His geeky yet likable personality which is a mainstay in all his eccentric videos and Instagram posts might fool you into thinking Majola’s rhymes come softer than continental pillows, but the dude can actually rap. Enough to impress Stogie T.

“Every Friday during the early stages of quarantine Stogie T was hosting IG lives where he was looking for some bar spitters that would feature on his next Friday Freestyle. I joined him on one of them and he loved what he saw and that’s how I ended up on there,” shares the artist.

Stogie T’s Freestyle Friday movement reignited the love for dope lyricism, was entertaining and perhaps most importantly, shone the spotlight on dope emcees who rarely get the recognition for their skills. “I definitely think that Freestyle Friday has given me credibility as an emcee you know,” Majola says. “Being on platform like Freestyle Friday amongst some of the greatest bar spitters in the country and being shown love by one of the best to ever touch the mic. I don’t think people view me any different though. For most of them Freestyle Friday was the first time they saw/ heard me. For those that already knew me I think they always knew that I can emcee.”

Majola has been based in Cape Town for about five years now, after relocating to join a Christian youth organization called The Message Trust. “…I’ve been curious about Joburg, however never thought it was right to move that side over the years.”

During his time in the Cape Majola has been part of a band, Kinetic IV which can be categorized as a faith collective that has a strong pop sound- Gospel seemingly targeted at young people. But it’s the stuff he’s done solo that really slaps and is more compelling. The difference isn’t just sonically, but his rhymes and his storytelling have a wider reach than the material he records with the band.

“First and foremost I’m a big consumer of music, I listen to [it] all the time. I listen to loads of genres and in that I love to explore different cultures and sub cultures they represent,” Majola says. He is yet to release a solo project, but he’s done a number of freestyles which have managed to generate hype around him.

In a move that is of a bygone era of rap, he tried his luck on radio at Good Hope FM’s cypher sessions on a Thursday evening, and through that Majola left a mark on legendary DJ Ready D. “This [Thursday Hip Hop show] was a platform for all upcoming emcees to come through and showcase their skills and represent where they’re from and this is where we met initially. He then later on contacted me and started chatting on collaborating on a tune together that we then recorded at Redbull Studios.” The song is on DJ Ready D’s new album Ghoema Music.

Majola reminds me of artists such as André 3000 who are aesthetically-conscious in everything they do. This goes beyond being dapper or having drip, but having that innate knowing of what looks and feels good.

The Man holding the cup, Jabulani Majola. Photo by Zoe Hibbert.
The Man holding the cup, Jabulani Majola. Photo by Zoe Hibbert.

His vest and chinos combination with no shoes in the Freestyle Friday video is a case in point. “I use to thriftshop a lot, visit second hand bookshops, going to markets and art exhibitions. I love meeting new people and starting conversations. I’m also a writer, I write poetry and spoken word, songs and short fiction, I also love fashion. I read a lot of SA historic fiction and poetry and biographies.”

20191224_145508-1280x1707.jpg
10min1233

AT the time of typing this, the number of COVID-19 deaths in South Africa stands at 15 168. Fatalities, especially when expressed in big numbers can simply go over one’s head as just statistics. But even one death hits hard when you lose someone you love.

I lost my brother, Thulani Ntiwane two months ago and this writing is no way about the virus. But a way of healing and honouring my brother who was by far the biggest influence in my life.

So while awaiting a match between Thulani’s beloved Real Madrid taking on Alavés in a La Liga game, we watched a recorded episode from season five of Black-ish. Aptly titled “Black History Month” the arch in which Octavia Spencer makes a special appearance, where her character pays homage to black persons she believes should never be forgotten. It’s only right I jot this, so that Thulani is never forgotten in the jam of all these numbers.

It is said that influence is when you’re not the one talking, and yet your words fill the room. The influence my brother had on me was just that.

As his name suggests, he was a quiet, reserved and nonchalant lanky dude who understood the power of being an African, who loved music, appreciated sport and who had reverence for knowledge.

HE NURTURED MY EAR IN MUSIC

Thulani would always say that I’m his student, to which I’d reluctantly (’cause of pride) admit. My brother’s music collection, over a thousand discs, was like a radio station’s playlist. A childhood friend of his would always joke that Thulani should be a music producer or a DJ.

In his collection you will find The Legendary Roots Crew, Khabzela’s Mekonko, Busi Mhlongo, Incognito, Mfaz’Omnyama, Maxwell, Masibuyele Kujehova, Brothers Of Peace, Gang Starr, Bill Withers, Hotstix, Lenny Kravitz, DJ FRESH, and so on and so on.

In the mid-90s my Thulani appeared in the Tembisan newspaper, after winning a music quiz that ran in the local publication. He walked away with 2PAC’s All Eyez On Me double-disc.

Thulani was a big advocate for buying original albums. He enjoyed tagging all of his CD covers with the trademark ‘Thulas’…this too was etched on me because, when I started buying CDs, I vividly remember scribbling ‘Bongs’ on my Like Water For Chocolate album cover. He shared music with me, this is why I enjoying doing the same for others today.

I grew up listening to a lot of music, hence I never had any problems even in my career when I was presented with the opportunity to interview great artists such as Musiq Soulchild, Ray Phiri, Mary J Blige or Raphael Saadique- I’d always find confidence in the knowledge my brother instilled in me. I could sense his pride-nothing egotistical, but happy that a seed he planted had sprouted in ways he also couldn’t fathom.

HE INTRODUCED ME TO JOBURG

Thulani was the one who showed me Joburg and how to carry myself in the big city. It must’ve been around 2004 when I first went to Carlton Centre, where we took that long and seemingly unending walk on Small Street. He bought me lunch at legendary boxer Baby Jake Matlala’s restaurant while we waited for the movie Troy to start-also my first time at the cinema.

Although I later grew to know the city for myself, it was Thulani who literally held my hand when I first came to eGoli.

HE SPARKED MY INTEREST IN MEDIA

I remember the days when the YFM studios were still in Rosebank, at the mall. I will never forget the feeling of being inside the Y Store-it felt like I was right inside their studios. He somehow knew it would interest me.From then on, the love for journalism, albeit broadcast journalism, began.

It was Thulani who got me reading newspapers every day. He got a subscription for the paper, and even after he moved out of home, he never stopped the paper from being delivered. Making sure that I carry on reading and engaging with the world around me.

HE CONSCIENTISED ME

This happened through music, books and in conversation. I was listening to the Wolves interlude on the Dead Prez Let’s Get Free album recently and it hit me, that at 10/11 years-old I was listening and reciting lyrics about imperialism and how evil the white man is without real comprehension of what was being said.

I remember when I told him that we’re reading Animal Farm in high school. His strong interest in the book (which he later borrowed) grew my interest.

I’ve read Steve Biko’s I Write What I Like a couple of times. I was first intrigued by the title, but more fascinated that my brother was reading such content. I went in and gobbled me some Biko and nothing was the same.

I doubt Tha Bravado, which has a strong voice in telling stories that are for Bantus by Bantus and inspired by Bantus, if it weren’t for Thulani.

SHARED THE BEAUTY OF SPORT

It’s very normal to support the team your dad or your older brother supported. My dad was a Kaizer Chiefs fan and so is my eldest brother. But I became an Orlando Pirate fan and a Gooner because I grew up watching Thulani cheer on Amabhakaniya and Arsenal.

He taught me how to watch the game of soccer. I remember watching that FIFA 2002 World Cup Semi-final between England and Brazil. Sport really brought us together.

I’m the rugby guy in the fam and he played a bit of cricket and soccer . We both had a strong love for sport, hence we spent his last moments watching a Real Madrid game. Whenever we’d see each other we would catch up on what’s happening, on and off the field.

Till we meet again bro,

Your faithful student.

Thulani Ntiwane is survived by his wife and four kids. His mother, two brothers a sister and two nieces. He was 44 years-old.

DSC0120-1280x1166.jpg
7min330

THE two things I’ve grown weary of, are load-shedding and social distancing, occurring simultaneously. But it wasn’t so bad chilling alone in the dark, listening to Adelle Nqeto’s Need Someone from the phone.

“That is the way I’m going to recommend listening to this one from now on (minus the load shedding)!” is Adelle’s response to the impromptu-tranquil set-up.

Need Someone is a song Adelle released just a week ago. I streamed it as an attempt to counterattack the awkward silence in the room, and couldn’t help but think of how timely the song is. You would swear the lyrics were knitted together by thoughts of people all around the world, who have been feeling lonely in the last eight months.

You’re building on your own now,

Is it all you ever wished for?

Are you happy you’re with yourself?

Independence is a strain,

No one’s pain but your own to shoulder -she sings on the song, over simple guitar chords.

The calming three-minute ditty was actually written about five years ago. “I only performed it live once, for Sofar Sounds JHB, and then never played it again. People have requested it since then, but it never felt necessary to get back to the song until recently,” Adelle tells me. “It’s definitely more about how I felt at the time I wrote the song. I think it makes sense now too, considering all of the loneliness and alienation that some people have experienced these last few months. I wrote the song at a time when I was considering my own vulnerability, my relationships and inter-dependence. This year has definitely brought some of those thoughts back up.”

The artist who hails from Pretoria is currently based in Berlin, Germany and hasn’t been home in almost a year now.

The pandemic has affected people in various unimaginable ways which have also come with complex reactions. Not every artist or creative would be the perfect feature on those cute Balcony Stories XL video clips. Adelle has also felt the severity of the times.

“…the reality is that this has been a heavy time, and my body’s response has not been to create,” Adelle opens up.

“SO much happened during lockdown- this whole year really. I think we all know that. Personally, I’ve been in protective/survival mode and creating has been difficult. I am not one of the people proposing that people be productive and come out with an incredible body of work after this time. I think if that’s how you deal with a pandemic, then good for you. But it’s been the opposite for me, and that is ok. I have spent a lot of this time sleeping/trying to fall sleep, reading, crying, writing, chatting to people I love, trying to pay my bills – while also trying not to feel guilty for not meeting the deadlines I set for myself.”

SIMPLY ADELLE. Photo by Susan van Tonder
SIMPLY ADELLE. Photo by Susan van Tonder

“I’m slowly starting to feel the shock of everything starting to settle now- at least emotionally, and I’m beginning to find a new rhythm of life, and the words to articulate what I’ve been feeling in this time. I’m almost certain that this will influence whatever work I release next, but even if it doesn’t, the words and melodies written in this time will not have been a waste.”

It certainly will not be for nought, when you see how a song written about half a decade ago has unquestionable relevance today. “I was terrified about this release- it’s SO simple and bare that I wondered whether it was necessary to even release it. I wasn’t sure how it would land, but the feedback has been great.”

Need Someone is a stand-alone single, but Adelle confirmed she is working on new releases.

Listen to Need Someone HERE

c6ptr0xxvm2rtufswcvw.png
8min1180

It was in May of 2016 that then SABC Chief Operations Officer Hlaudi Motsoeneng, temerariously declared that all the national broadcaster’s radio stations playlists will be dominated by home-grown ditties. The infamous 90% local music quota.

Motsoeneng was like the uncle who in his inebriated state at a family gathering, announced that the whole family should come to his house the following weekend for another get-together where there would be an ubiquity of food and beverages, without discussing it with his frugal wife.

The redundant radio station managers who never seem to sheath their appetite for payola, being the stingy wife in the analogy.

Although the move evinced Motsoeneng’s strange benign for artists, he never thought through the execution of such a catalytic move. In an interview with Nicky B on Kaya FM’s World Show around the same time, Nakhane Touré said one of the problems with the ratio is that listeners won’t be introduced to new music by radio stations. “Instead of hearing one Mafikizolo song a day, we’ll now hear two or three,” said Touré. Of course the Fog singer was making a mere example (he did say he loves the dance duo) but his point was clearer than a pair of new specs.

Of the countless utterances we’ve had to endure from Motsoeneng, I’m pondering particularly on this very one during the Covid-19 lockdown, because I’ve been immersed in South African music of different kinds for the last few weeks and I imagine how South Africa would be sounding like, had Motsoeneng’s wish been carefully granted.

To be more specific, it’s the Siya Makuzeni Sextet album, Out Of This World that has had me imagining a world where South Africans are exposed to their finest talent.

Siya Mukuzeni is an insanely talented artist who delivers her craft with ingenuity, ubuntu, vigour and in what looks seamlessness. The trombonist who also belts out notes has been in the industry for over 15 years now, playing in some of the biggest bands with fine musicians on world stages. She was part of Carlo Mombelli’s Prisoners of Strange ensemble between 2002 and 2011. She was also in the Blue Notes Tribute Ochestra where she played with the likes of Marcus Wyatt, Johnny Dyani and Chris McGregor. Together with another unique ensemble of equally talented artists, collectively known as Spaza, she released an album of the same name a year ago.

With the Siya Makuzeni Sextet, she put together some of her favourite musicians who she enjoys to play with to create a body of work that I believe more South Africans need to hear. The sextet comprises of Thandi Ntuli on piano, Ayanda Sikade on the drums, the trumpet being blown by Sakhile Simani, Sisonke Xoti playing the saxophone and Benjamin Japhta on bass.

There’s often the juxtaposition to bassist Esperanza Spalding because they both are female, sing and play an instrument. They’ll always be comparisons of females, especially in an industry without women in the forefront. Although the groove in their music is undeniable, Siya’s got the juice. That unfiltered African juice form the wells of the Eastern Cape.

Like on the title track, Out Of This World which teems with traditional Xhosa music from the first second, this while embracing modern sounds. Her voice is undeniably infectious as Stevie Wonder’s or Thandiswa Mazwai’s. The song New Age is a reiteration of a sought-out truth, while landing somewhat as a lament. Say Sibusile Xaba’s Uyahlupha. The joint has swing and it serves its purpose.

The seven track album has a fair balance for the padentic jazz ear that prefers songs without vocals, only the sound of instruments dancing. Another one composed by Makuzeni on the album, a Brazen Dream is a good introduction to Jazz for someone new to the abyss that is the genre.

I’m a sucker for great vocals accompanied by some dope show-don’t-tell typa lyrics which take the role of a travel tour guide, when listening to the music. Imagine a congregation singing Moya Oyingcwele in unison, truly in the spirit. It slaps umoya.

I feel the Holy Spirit’s presence each time I listen to this song-I’m overwhelmed with questions of how this song was conceived. With churches being open now, I believe choir conductors/worship leaders should introduce Moya Oyingcwele emasontweni, if they haven’t.

Out Of This World is just one of many great projects by a South African artist. People need to hear more of this and many other albums. To enjoy them, while simultaneously putting some randelas in the artists’ pockets. True “proudly South African” shit.

Listen to the album HERE


About us

We’ll Not Change The World Ourselves. But We’ll Spark The Minds That Do.
Read More

CONTACT US




Newsletter



I'm not a robot
View our Privacy Policy